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The lost and found project: Imagineering fragmedialities
Stockholm University of the Arts, The Film and Media Department. Norske program for kunstnerisk utviklingsarbeid.
2019 (English)Artistic output (Refereed)
Resource type
Mixed material
Description [en]

The Lost and Found project (2016-2018)In 1988 the thinker Roger Lipsey. Lipsey, R. (1988) takes his cue from Kandinsky’s book “Concerning the Spiritual in Art” from 1912Kandinsky, W. (1977)and compares the artistic process with “the way whales sweep through the plankton of the sea in order to survive”. https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036

Similarly, it is only what the artist “happens to shunt” that is worth creating with. Whatever happens, it is associations that control the artistic process.Lipsey believes that “association is the kingdom of chance”, that the feeling of “knowing” is an impossible chimera, as our memories are so overwhelming and, either way, “live their own life”. From this angle, comprehension can of course never be used as a measure of artistic quality and risk itself is of course a habitual component. Nevertheless, visual media has long dominated the narrative hierarchies and created a clear and linear line for our world and other “materialities” to follow.Cox, C. (2011) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036

This line involves the stubborn persistence of the same capitalist narratives that eventually have been accepted as the only natural, essentially logical versions, commodifying our society through our own simplified conclusions and joint ignorance. Haraway, D. (1988) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183 https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036SOUND AND NOISE

The Lost and Found project (LOF) began as an attempt to challenge myself and my role in these cemented, narrative structures through exploring the liabilities of sound as an emancipated sociocultural, and possibly counterpart, material. LaBelle, B. (2017), Mouffe, C. (2007) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036I wanted to try going beyond the common concepts of sound quality, noise, acoustics and technology. But even more importantly, risking our perception of what sound is for –and what it can do? https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/491932

Efforts to define and measuresound and noise have a long history closely linked to the developmentof architectural acoustics and noise controlacross many disciplines. Blauert, J., Guski, R. (2009), Blauert, J. (2012) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036 Nevertheless, the mammoth task of truly addressing sound as a material in the landscape remains, symbolised by “unpleasant” noise as an objective quantity and “pleasant” sound as a subjective condition. https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/491932/125/1299 In this project, I began to detect some interesting similarities between the rhetoric of the narratives structures imposed upon people in a mainstream, capitalist society and my own subdued material; sound. Haraway, D. (1988) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036I decided to compare them, not only to alter the perception and possibilities of spaces outside the political strongholds, but to provide new perspectives on the norms surrounding sound and noise.

This was a precarious operation for me as the project meant, not only challenging my own safety zone of tried and tested sound aesthetics and dramaturgies, but my role as an artist/wanna-be-ethnographer Foster, H.(1996) regularly interfering through documenting without asking Waldock, J (2011). https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036 It also meant challenging these same perceptions of my peers in the sound art community if, and when,my sounds “sounded like shit”. In order to attempt going beyond this aesthetic and socio-cultural baggage, I started to explore the framework of chance operated live performance as a method. LaBelle, B. (2013) https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/492674/100/762 https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/545183/1/1036 By randomly mixing and intuitively layering leftover, odd and uncategorised sound fragments and scraps from different origins, I began to catch glimpses of alternative sound worlds and sites, emerging from the thick sound layers. https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/372518/492674/1473/134

Abstract [en]

The Lost and Found project began as an attempt to challenge my own sound making in opposition to a linear, capitalist, narrative tradition, dominated by visual culture. I wanted to explore the possibilities of sound as a counterpart material risking our perception of what sound is and what it can do. To reach beyond my own aesthetic and sociocultural baggage, I started to experiment with chance operated live performance as a method. By multilayering uncategorised sound scraps the work emerged to “produce itself” and I began to catch glimpses of alternative sound worlds and sites. I called the method fragmenturgy (fragmented dramaturgy) and the alternative realities that were created; fragmedialities (fragmented mediality, fragmented reality).

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm, 2019.
Publication channel
VIS journal ISSN 2003-024X;1
Keywords [en]
live art, live performance, Dj, sound, soundscape, sound art, sound narrative, sound engineering, listening, deep listening, ruralism, materiality, technology, imagination, imaginary listening, live electronics, live installation, remix, socially engaged art, ethnography, Noise, Noise Regulation, space, place, Site-specific, culture geography
National Category
Music Performing Arts
Research subject
Artistic practices
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:uniarts:diva-520DOI: 10.22501/visOAI: oai:DiVA.org:uniarts-520DiVA, id: diva2:1284026
Projects
ISSN 2003-024XAvailable from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved

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